Reply To: Sottimano Wine Tasting

#3162
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Michael Horne
Keymaster

Hi Michael – very nice review of the wines, thanks for posting. I haven’t explored Sottimano before, and I’ll have to give them a try.  The Currá sounds fascinating, I’ll have to hunt down a bottle.

To help fellow wine lovers find the wines you’ve listed, I’ve done a little research and will summarize what I’ve found below.

Cin cin!
Michael


Click to visit the Sottimano websiteAzienda Agricola Sottimano

Website: http://www.sottimano.it/en
Location: Via Cottà, 21, Neive (CN) 12052.  Find them on Google maps here.
Winery visits:  Sure, they’re just outside Neive near Barbaresco. Just be sure to email or call in advance to make a reservation to visit their cantina
Tele: +39.0173.635.186
E-mail: info@sottimano.it


Sottimano Nebbiolo di Langhe 2010Sottimano Nebbiolo di Langhe 2010

Producer wine notes: On their website here
Price range:  $18-26
Antonio Galloni (ala Robert Parker — if you like that sorta thing): 91 points
Locating the wineFind it online here

 


Sottimano Barbera d'Alba Pairolero 2010Sottimano Barbera d’Alba Pairolero 2010

Producer wine notes: On their website here
Price range: $25
Antonio Galloni: 92 points
Locating the wine: Find it online here

 


curra-big_3Sottimano Barbaresco Currá 2008

Producer wine notes: On their website here
Price range: $55-75
Antonio Galloni: 94+ points
Locating the wine: Find it online here

 


Sottimano Barbaresco Riserva 2005Sottimano Barbaresco Riserva 2008

Producer wine notes: On their website here  (NOTE: Only 2005 notes available on their website)
Price range: $80-100
Antonio Galloni: 94 points
Locating the wine: Find it online here

 


Sottimano Dolcetto d'Alba Bric del Salto 2011Sottimano Dolcetto d’Alba Bric del Salto 2011

Producer wine notes: On their website here
Price range
: $14-20
Locating the wine: Find it online here

 

 


Interesting comments from Antonio Galloni on Sottimano

I can’t say enough good things about the Sottimano family and the work they have done over the years to firmly establish themselves among Barbaresco’s top growers. This is one of the few places in Piedmont where every wine is consistently delicious. The only question is how delicious. In recent years, Andrea Sottimano has worked to give his Barbareschi extended time on the lees in a cold cellar, which also slows down the malos. This distinctly Burgundian approach stands in stark contrast to the way most French oak-aged wines are made in Piedmont, where malos typically follow right after the alcoholic fermentations. I tasted the 2010s just after they were bottled. Readers should take these notes as brief impressions on wines that will continue to come to life with further time in bottle.

Michael Horne, CS
Los Gatos, CA USA